What in the World is Twelfth Night?: A Visit with the Ghost of Twelfth Night Past

Usually, at this time of year preparations are well underway for our annual Twelfth Night at Kenmore: A Dramatic Performance.  The play takes place in January 1776, during the first Christmas season celebrated at Kenmore. Unfortunately, this year’s celebration of Twelfth Night at Kenmore is canceled due to winter weather.  However, if you are familiar … Continue reading What in the World is Twelfth Night?: A Visit with the Ghost of Twelfth Night Past

Maritime History at Kenmore & Ferry Farm

Today – September 30 – is World Maritime Day. The United Nations and the International Maritime Organization created World Maritime Day in 1978 “to celebrate the international maritime industry’s contribution towards the world’s economy, especially in shipping.” "The South East Prospect of London from the Tower to London Bridge" (1746) by John Maurer. Credit: Royal … Continue reading Maritime History at Kenmore & Ferry Farm

“Mark’d with Gunpowder”: Tattoos in Early America

Recently, I came across an interesting notice in an early edition of the Virginia Gazette.  On June 9, 1738, Augustine Washington, George Washington’s father, placed a notice in the newspaper about one of his indentured servants running away.  The notice read… “RAN away from Capt. McCarty’s Plantation, on Pope’s Creek, in Westmoreland County, a Servant … Continue reading “Mark’d with Gunpowder”: Tattoos in Early America

“I have the honor to be, your obedient servant”: Why Did Washington End His Letters this Way?

How many times have you watched Hamilton? It’s okay, I’ve lost count too. In my most recent viewing, when Burr and Hamilton each proudly proclaim their letter-ending valedictions in the song “Your Obedient Servant”, I began thinking “Where exactly did this phrase come from, why did they use it, and how did it fall out … Continue reading “I have the honor to be, your obedient servant”: Why Did Washington End His Letters this Way?

Summer Stinks!: The Odoriferous 18th Century

Editor’s Note: Looking back in time, people’s personal hygiene, fashion choices, medical treatments, and more sometimes look, at the very least, bizarre, if not outright disgusting.  When confronted with these weird or gross practices, our first reaction can be to dismiss our ancestors as primitive, ignorant, or just silly.  Before such judgments, however, we should try … Continue reading Summer Stinks!: The Odoriferous 18th Century

Lecture – Foodways in the 18th Century [Video]

On Tuesday, May 14, 2019, Park Ranger Deborah Lawton of George Washington Birthplace National Monument presented a lecture titled “Foodways in the 18th Century” that explored the new dishes and changing tastes of the time. Join us on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 for “The Social Role of Garbage in Colonial Virginia” with Dave Muraca, Director … Continue reading Lecture – Foodways in the 18th Century [Video]

Rooms at Rest

Visitors to Kenmore on the evening of April 13th will have the opportunity to see the Dining Room in a very different light, both literally and figuratively.  In preparation for our evening program Letters from the Past, we will be putting the room “at rest,” an arrangement that would have been very familiar to the … Continue reading Rooms at Rest