Camp George v. George: A Summer Camp to Travel Back to Colonial Virginia

School is out for summer…almost! Students are counting down the days until they are free from homework, but the learning does not have to stop!. The George Washington Foundation has been busy preparing fun-filled summer camps to encourage critical thinking through exploring the past. In our Camp George v. George, students will be asked, “Would … Continue reading Camp George v. George: A Summer Camp to Travel Back to Colonial Virginia

Winter Ailments (and how to endure them in the eighteenth century)

As spring approaches in the Middle Atlantic and Northeastern states, we welcome the chance to spend more time outdoors in the fresh air instead of cooped up in our houses – getting sick.  Ailments such as colds and flu are contractible anytime, but we usually associate them with the wintertime as that’s when they seem … Continue reading Winter Ailments (and how to endure them in the eighteenth century)

You’ve Got Mail: Development of the Colonial Postal Service in Virginia

The sending of a letter in Colonial America was more challenging than today.  The concept of post offices and regularly scheduled mail arrivals and departures evolved slowly in the colonies.  Colonial mail faced many obstacles.   Geography, political opposition, and a general lack of interest hindered a national system that serviced all the colonies.  How to … Continue reading You’ve Got Mail: Development of the Colonial Postal Service in Virginia

What in the World is Twelfth Night?: A Visit with the Ghost of Twelfth Night Past

Usually, at this time of year preparations are well underway for our annual Twelfth Night at Kenmore: A Dramatic Performance.  The play takes place in January 1776, during the first Christmas season celebrated at Kenmore. Unfortunately, this year’s celebration of Twelfth Night at Kenmore is canceled due to winter weather.  However, if you are familiar … Continue reading What in the World is Twelfth Night?: A Visit with the Ghost of Twelfth Night Past

Maritime History at Kenmore & Ferry Farm

Today – September 30 – is World Maritime Day. The United Nations and the International Maritime Organization created World Maritime Day in 1978 “to celebrate the international maritime industry’s contribution towards the world’s economy, especially in shipping.” "The South East Prospect of London from the Tower to London Bridge" (1746) by John Maurer. Credit: Royal … Continue reading Maritime History at Kenmore & Ferry Farm

“Mark’d with Gunpowder”: Tattoos in Early America

Recently, I came across an interesting notice in an early edition of the Virginia Gazette.  On June 9, 1738, Augustine Washington, George Washington’s father, placed a notice in the newspaper about one of his indentured servants running away.  The notice read… “RAN away from Capt. McCarty’s Plantation, on Pope’s Creek, in Westmoreland County, a Servant … Continue reading “Mark’d with Gunpowder”: Tattoos in Early America

“I have the honor to be, your obedient servant”: Why Did Washington End His Letters this Way?

How many times have you watched Hamilton? It’s okay, I’ve lost count too. In my most recent viewing, when Burr and Hamilton each proudly proclaim their letter-ending valedictions in the song “Your Obedient Servant”, I began thinking “Where exactly did this phrase come from, why did they use it, and how did it fall out … Continue reading “I have the honor to be, your obedient servant”: Why Did Washington End His Letters this Way?