1925 Dedication Day: A (Block) Party from the Past

Spring is a busy time of year for historic house museums, as we see an influx of school groups, vacationers, and families taking advantage of the beautiful weather. This spring is an especially exciting year at Historic Kenmore since we are preparing to celebrate our centennial anniversary! As discussed in our previous blog post, it … Continue reading 1925 Dedication Day: A (Block) Party from the Past

Kenmore’s Centennial: How the Ladies of the Kenmore Association Saved the Lewis Family Home

The year 2022 is significant for The George Washington Foundation as it is the centennial of the saving of Kenmore.  We have begun the new year with a new exhibit exploring the saving of Kenmore by The Kenmore Association and the beginning of the restoration of the house and turning it into a treasured historic … Continue reading Kenmore’s Centennial: How the Ladies of the Kenmore Association Saved the Lewis Family Home

What in the World is Twelfth Night?: A Visit with the Ghost of Twelfth Night Past

Usually, at this time of year preparations are well underway for our annual Twelfth Night at Kenmore: A Dramatic Performance.  The play takes place in January 1776, during the first Christmas season celebrated at Kenmore. Unfortunately, this year’s celebration of Twelfth Night at Kenmore is canceled due to winter weather.  However, if you are familiar … Continue reading What in the World is Twelfth Night?: A Visit with the Ghost of Twelfth Night Past

A National Treasure’s Life: A History of The Declaration of Independence

Join us for our first Movie on the Lawn event at Historic Kenmore on Friday, September 17 as we show National Treasure starring Nicholas Cage and the Declaration of Independence! FACT: George Washington’s Culper Spy Ring used codes, ciphers, and invisible ink (among other tactics) to outwit the British during the American Revolution. FICTION: There … Continue reading A National Treasure’s Life: A History of The Declaration of Independence

National Parks, National Historic Landmarks, and the National Register of Historic Places, Oh My!

Throughout my time as a museum professional, I have worked at several different museums each with different classifications, rules, and operating procedures. Before entering the museum world, I used to think that most museums operated in a similar way. However, that could not be further from the truth. One of the most common questions I … Continue reading National Parks, National Historic Landmarks, and the National Register of Historic Places, Oh My!

Liberty vs. The King: National Identities in Two Lewis Family Drinking Vessels

Visitors to Kenmore’s Drawing Room may have noticed an unusual pairing of glassware and ceramic pieces displayed on the gaming table - a beautiful, air-twist stem wine glass sitting next to a Westerwald pottery jug. At first glance, this small vignette may simply appear to depict a wine jug at the ready, waiting to fill … Continue reading Liberty vs. The King: National Identities in Two Lewis Family Drinking Vessels

Stories that Demand to be Told: Fielding Lewis and the Bray School for Educating Enslaved Children

During the 18th century, the city of Fredericksburg was described as “a considerable town of trade, furnishing the country around.”[1] As such, it was deemed a rather important town and was the site of one of two schools for enslaved children established in Virginia during the Colonial period. The school was located somewhere downtown, likely … Continue reading Stories that Demand to be Told: Fielding Lewis and the Bray School for Educating Enslaved Children

What Was Old Is New Again: The Return of a Map & Floorcloth to Fielding Lewis’s Office

There were exciting arrivals at Historic Kenmore at the end of March! Two new additions made their debut in Fielding Lewis’s Office – a reproduction map on hanging rollers, and a long-awaited floorcloth.    Fielding Lewis owned 6 maps, which we assume he stored in his office.  One of those maps may well have been what … Continue reading What Was Old Is New Again: The Return of a Map & Floorcloth to Fielding Lewis’s Office