Catherine of Braganza: How the copy of a 17th-century plate tells the story of design, consumer consumption, and the Washington Family

The concept of buying items to remember certain events or travels is commonplace today. Who goes abroad without bringing back a trinket naming the location? Is it possible to go antiquing without seeing an item that commemorates the wedding of Charles and Diana? Even the smallest item has the ability to tell a story through … Continue reading Catherine of Braganza: How the copy of a 17th-century plate tells the story of design, consumer consumption, and the Washington Family

Winter Ailments (and how to endure them in the eighteenth century)

As spring approaches in the Middle Atlantic and Northeastern states, we welcome the chance to spend more time outdoors in the fresh air instead of cooped up in our houses – getting sick.  Ailments such as colds and flu are contractible anytime, but we usually associate them with the wintertime as that’s when they seem … Continue reading Winter Ailments (and how to endure them in the eighteenth century)

You’ve Got Mail: Development of the Colonial Postal Service in Virginia

The sending of a letter in Colonial America was more challenging than today.  The concept of post offices and regularly scheduled mail arrivals and departures evolved slowly in the colonies.  Colonial mail faced many obstacles.   Geography, political opposition, and a general lack of interest hindered a national system that serviced all the colonies.  How to … Continue reading You’ve Got Mail: Development of the Colonial Postal Service in Virginia